“I hate government. I’m apolitical. Write that down. I’m not a Republican.”

 

Bruce Willis

“I could never write my memoirs, just because too many people are still alive and would be hurt.”

 

Bruce Willis

“I write screenplays that don’t get made and pilots that don’t get picked up, and I re-write other people’s movies, and those are all different kinds of fees.”

 

Bruce Vilanch

“Eddie Izzard is absolutely brilliant. I would love to write something for him.”

 

Bruce Vilanch

“I do a lot of screen re-writing.”

 

Bruce Vilanch

“I wouldn’t describe that “position” as “parasitic.” I’d describe that experience as “edifying.” I don’t merely write from a critical intellectual distance. I actually live around here.”

 

Bruce Sterling

“Saying you have a political solution is like saying you can write a pop song that’s going to stay at the top of the list forever. I don’t have many illusions about this, but I’m not cynical about it.”

 

Bruce Sterling

“I like to get paid for doing basic research, so it’s pleasant to write some nonfiction about it.”

 

Bruce Sterling

“I do have two data identities. I have my name, Bruce Sterling, which is my public name under which I write novels. I also have my other name, which is my legal name under which I own property and vote.”

 

Bruce Sterling

“You need two things to remain very, very present. You need to continue to write well and engage yourself in the issues of the day. And you have to continue to make good, relevant records.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I have to write and play. If I became an electrician tomorrow, I’d still come home at night and write songs.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“The book was just something that came along after we played the Super Bowl and I wrote a little essay that went online. Then I had two or three weeks and I said, wow, that essay was pretty good. Maybe I’ll try and write some other stuff. Writing about the depression, I just felt – you know, when you write a book like this, you have to open up your life. You have to be willing to do so to a certain degree.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I’m used to writing something, it becomes a record, it comes out. Then I go perform and I play it and I get this immediate feedback from the audience. So that’s been the pattern of my life.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“You still had to find the music inside your language. You know, it was – that’s a big part of what sort of moved me to begin writing the book. I wrote a little essay and I felt, yeah, this is a good voice. This is a good feeling. It feels like me.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“The different social forces that affected my parents’ lives or my friends’ lives or I saw around me became essential for me to write about.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I think that, when you’re writing your songs, there’s always a debate about whether, is that you in the song? Is it not you in the song?”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I don’t write demographically. I don’t write a song to reach these people or those people.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I don’t like to write rhetorically or get on a soapbox. I try to make the stuff multi-layered, so that it always has a life outside its social context. I don’t believe that you can tell people anything; you can only draw them in.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I was always concerned with writing to my age at a particular moment. That was the way I would keep faith with the audience that supported me as I went along.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“I tend to be a subscriber to the idea that you have everything you need by the time you’re 12 years old to do interesting writing for most of the rest of your life – certainly by the time you’re 18.”

 

Bruce Springsteen