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“A brilliant 1989 album, Oh Mercy; some career retrospectives; and two albums of American folk songs, with just Bob Dylan and his guitar and harmonica. All that culminated in the Grammy-winning comeback album, Time Out of Mind (1997). Once again, just as Dylan seemed to be out of it, he was back at the top of his game.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Bob Dylan wrote in his elliptical memoir, Chronicles: Volume One, he was washed up in the 1980s, no longer a commercial success, and no longer putting out good work.”

 

Bob Dylan

“The confessional singer-songwriter movement of the 1970s was in full swing, and Bob Dylan’s emotional album [ Blood on the Tracks] resonated with the times. There would be other hits, but never the same alchemy of emotion and time.”

 

Bob Dylan

“I don’t think there’s enough guns.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Ah, current music. What would that be? Ah, really, a lot of it sounds defective to me. It makes me restless.”

 

Bob Dylan

“In the meantime [1965-67], [Bob] Dylan was again writing some of the best love songs in the genre, like “Visions of Johanna,” “Just Like a Woman,” and “Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands.””

 

Bob Dylan

“We shouldn’t confuse singers and performers with actors. Actors will say, “My character this, and my character that.” Like beating a dead horse. Who cares about the character? Just get up and act. You don’t have to explain it to me.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Every singer has three or four or five techniques, and you can force them together in different combinations. Some of the techniques you discard along the way, and pick up others. But you do need them. It’s just like anything. You have to know certain things about what you’re doing that other people don’t know. Singing has to do with techniques and how many you use at the same time. One alone doesn’t work. There’s no point to going over three. But you might interchange them whenever you feel like it. It’s a bit like alchemy.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Early on, before rock ‘n’ roll, I listened to big band music – anything that came over the radio – and music played by bands in hotels that our parents could dance to. We had a big radio that looked like a jukebox, with a record player on the top. The radio/record player played 78rpm records. When we moved to that house, there was a record on there, with a red label. It was Bill Monroe, or maybe it was the Stanley Brothers. I’d never heard anything like that before. Ever. And it moved me away from all the conventional music that I was hearing.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Sometimes you get out from behind the wheel and let someone else step on the gas.”

 

Bob Dylan

“I think of rock ‘n’ roll as a combination of country blues and swing band music, not Chicago blues, and modern pop.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Up north, you could find these radio stations with no name on the dials that played pre-rock ‘n’ roll things – country blues. We would hear Slim Harpo or Lightnin’ Slim and gospel groups, the Dixie Hummingbirds, the Five Blind Boys of Alabama. I was so far north, I didn’t even know where Alabama was.”

 

Bob Dylan

“America was founded on the backs of slaves.”

 

Bob Dylan

“His [Bob Dylan] humour was dry and splendid.”

 

Bob Dylan

“The exploitation and superficiality of mainstream America is the object not of [Bob] Dylan’s hipster scorn, but of an apocalyptic parable of holy fools and righteous thieves – the kind of imagery that Dylan’s later work would explore more fully.”

 

Bob Dylan

“If you wanted to, it would be easy to find some crappy lyrics [of Bob Dylan] from the Eighties to undermine the Nobel Prize.”

 

Bob Dylan

“”Tangled Up in Blue,” shifts perspective several times during the song to tell a “tangled” version of [Bob] Dylan’s marriage and dissolution.”

 

Bob Dylan

“It was [meeting with Nicolas Sarkozy] like looking at my mirror image.”

 

Bob Dylan

“I see the turning of the page, curtain rising on a new age, see the groom still waiting at the altar.”

 

Bob Dylan

“Along with some of the worst music of Bob Dylan’s career (“Self-Portrait,” 1970), this period produced some gems – including many songs recorded with The Band in ’67 but not released until years later.”

 

Bob Dylan