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“Even in the most purely logical realms, it is insight that first arrives at what is new.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Marx’s father became a Christian when Marx was a little boy, and some, at least, of the dogmas he must have then accepted seem to have born fruit in his son’s psychology.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know we become insensitive to many things of great importance.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“The pleasure of work is open to anyone who can develop some specialised skill, provided that he can get satisfaction from the exercise of his skill without demanding universal applause.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Law in origin was merely a codification of the power of dominant groups, and did not aim at anything that to a modern man would appear to be justice”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Do not feel certain of anything.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Literature is inexhaustible, with every book a homage to infinity”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Every housemaid expects at least once a week as much excitement as would have lasted a Jane Austen heroine throughout a whole novel.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“In all the creative work that I have done, what has come first is a problem, a puzzle involving discomfort.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“With civilized men…, it is, I think, chiefly love of excitement which makes the populace applaud when war breaks out; the emotion is exactly the same as at a football match, although the results are sometimes somewhat more serious.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Frege has the merit of … finding a third assertion by recognising the world of logic which is neither mental nor physical.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Undoubtedly the desire for food has been and still is one of the main causes of political events.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“The main thing needed to make men happy is intelligence.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Philosophers, for the most part, are constitutionally timid, and dislike the unexpected. Few of them would be genuinely happy as pirates or burglars. Accordingly they invent systems which make the future calculable, at least in its main outlines.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Education ought to foster the wish for truth, not the conviction that some particular creed is the truth.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Nine-tenths of the appeal of pornography is due to the indecent feelings concerning sex which moralists inculcate in the young; the other tenth is physiological, and will occur in one way or another whatever the state of the law may be.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“I did not, however, commit suicide, because I wished to know more of mathematics.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“It is impossible to read in America, except on a train, because of the telephone. Everyone has a telephone, and it rings all day and most of the night.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“The military superiority of Europe to Asia is not an eternal law of nature, as we are tempted to think, and our superiority in civilization is a mere delusion.”

 

Bertrand Russell

“Envy … is one form of a vice, partly moral, partly intellectual, which consists in seeing things never in themselves but only in their relations.”

 

Bertrand Russell