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“I do not presume that I have found the best philosophy, I know that I understand the true philosophy.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“I should attempt to treat human vice and folly geometrically… the passions of hatred, anger, envy, and so on, considered in themselves, follow from the necessity and efficacy of nature… I shall, therefore, treat the nature and strength of the emotion in exactly the same manner, as though I were concerned with lines, planes, and solids.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“I have resolved to demonstrate by a certain and undoubted course of argument, or to deduce from the very condition of human nature, not what is new and unheard of, but only such things as agree best with practice.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Things could not have been brought into being by God in any manner or in any order different from that which has in fact obtained.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Yet nature cannot be contravened, but preserves a fixed and immutable order.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“As men’s habits of mind differ, so that some more readily embrace one form of faith, some another, for what moves one to pray may move another to scoff, I conclude … that everyone should be free to choose for himself the foundations of his creed, and that faith should be judged only by its fruits.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“The greater emotion with which we conceive a loved object to be affected toward us, the greater will be our complacency.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Self-complacency is pleasure accompanied by the idea of oneself as cause.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“According as each has been educated, so he repents of or glories in his actions.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“If we love something similar to ourselves, we endeavor, as far as we can, to bring it about that it should love us in return.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“The multitude always strains after rarities and exceptions, and thinks little of the gifts of nature; so that, when prophecy is talked of, ordinary knowledge is not supposed to be included. Nevertheless it has as much right as any other to be called Divine.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“If the way which I have pointed out as leading to this result (i.e., power over the emotions by which the wise man surpasses the ignorant man) seems exceedingly hard, it may nevertheless be discovered. Needs must it be hard, since it is so seldom found. How would it be possible, if salvation were ready to our hand, and could without great labour be found, that it should be by almost all men neglected? But all things excellent are as difficult as they are rare.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Things which are accidentally the causes either of hope or fear are called good or evil omens.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Blessedness is not the reward of virtue but virtue itself.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“In proportion as we endeavor to live according to the guidance of reason, shall we strive as much as possible to depend less on hope, to liberate ourselves from fear, to rule fortune, and to direct our actions by the sure counsels of reason.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“All the objects pursued by the multitude not only bring no remedy that tends to preserve our being, but even act as hinderances, causing the death not seldom of those who possess them, and always of those who are possessed by them.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Simply from the fact that we have regarded a thing with the emotion of pleasure or pain, though that thing be not the efficient cause of the emotion, we can either love or hate it.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“Many errors, of a truth, consist merely in the application of the wrong names of things. For if a man says that the lines which are drawn from the centre of the circle to the circumference are not equal, he understands by the circle, at all events for the time, something else than mathematicians understand by it.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“If anyone conceives, that an object of his love joins itself to another with closer bonds of friendship than he himself has attained to, he will be affected with hatred towards the loved object and with envy towards his rival.”

 

Baruch Spinoza

“If a man had begun to hate an object of his love, so that love is thoroughly destroyed, he will, causes being equal, regard it with more hatred than if he had never loved it, and his hatred will be in proportion to the strength of his former love.”

 

Baruch Spinoza