“I have one rave New York Times review framed next to a flop Los Angeles Times review. And it’s for the same show. These people watched the same show. That’s what happens. They love it, they hate it.”

 

Bruce Vilanch

“Patti [ Scialfa] was an artist and a musician and she was a songwriter. And she was a lot like me in that she was transient also. She worked busking on the streets in New York. She waitressed. She had – she just lived a life – she lived a musician’s life. She lived an artist’s life. So we were both people who were very uncomfortable in a domestic setting, getting together and trying to build one and seeing if our particularly strange jigsaw puzzle pieces were going to fit together in a way that was going to create something different for the two of us. And it did.”

 

Bruce Springsteen

“When I was in New York it was like a maze, a rat maze, going from one little box to another little box and passing through passageways to get from one safe haven to another.”

 

Bruce Conner

“I got Sonny up to Harlem, and we started street playin’ in New York. We did that for three or four years and survived. We brought it back to the streets again.”

Brownie McGhee

“New Yorkers are inclined to assume it will never rain, and certainly not on New Yorkers.”

Brooks Atkinson

“I’m a pretty private person. I’m not “out there” out there. From living in New York City, I developed a certain awareness that you have to have when you live by yourself.”

Brooklyn Sudano

“I went to an ordinary school in New York City with no other actors. I learned to compartmentalise different parts of my life. I was one person at home and then another person at work and for that reason my career didn’t challenge my family life.”

Brooke Shields

“It was my mom and I against the world. We lived in New York in this bohemian lifestyle where an extended group of artists and photographers were like my aunts and uncles.”

Brooke Shields

“Boston fans – and New York fans are the same – it doesn’t matter what you do outside of baseball, they don’t forgive or forget that you play in pinstripes and they don’t care about your interests off the field.”

Bronson Arroyo

“Why the hell not run a race across the United States? A balls-out, shoot-the-moon, f***-the-establishment rumble from New York to Los Angeles to prove what we had been harping about for years, for example, that good drivers in good automobiles could employ the American Interstate system the same way the Germans were using their Autobahns? Yes, make high-speed travel by car a reality! Truth and justice affirmed by an overtly illegal act.”

 

Brock Yates

“I’ve been trained in dancing and I used to be quite good, though I am a bit rusty right now. But I could probably brush up in a couple of months. The funny thing is that I actually took classes from Savion Glover, who worked in Happy Feet, when I was a kid. Isn’t that wild? I was part of a selected group that was brought into New York from New Jersey (which is where I’m from) to study, every Saturday: ballet, jazz and tap. It was a musical comedy group.”

 

Brittany Murphy

“When I moved to New York in my 20s, I didn’t have an obnoxious ego, but it was huge! I’ll thought, “I’ll never die and I can do anything.””

 

Britta Phillips

“For me, Woody Allen’s ‘Manhattan’ defines New York. Both New York and Manhattan Island should be in black in white! I always hear the soundtrack of Gershwin in my head every time I go over the Queensboro Bridge, or come in from JFK because of it!”

 

Brian Cox

“I told my team before we walked out on to the field in Tampa, I wanted them to stop and look each other in the eye – I mean really look each other in the eye because 10 minutes after we we’re done beating the New York Giants, I knew that world would change; free agency, the business side of the business. I wanted them to appreciate this doesn’t come very often. It may be the last time you have that opportunity.”

 

Brian Billick

“I did New York, I Love You which is a very personal film for me. My most personal film, but it’s not like a film I’ve ever made. I would never do that film as a feature, for instance, because it’s not very commercial of an idea.”

Brett Ratner

“I love it. It’s all good to me. Whether I’m performing in New York, L.A., Columbus or Des Moines, I give 110 percent every night.”

Bret Michaels

“It’s easy to struggle in New York. I think New York is a bit expensive.”

Bret McKenzie

“Gian Luigi Polidoro and his girlfriend had written this script, it was an American comedy, and they decided I was the guy to play the part. I was young, they offered me the lead in the film, and I said, “Sure, I’ll do it.” And I’m telling you, there is a movie waiting to be made about the making of a movie like that, particularly at that time in New York. I mean, we shot all over the streets of New York without permits. We would literally grab a shot and run. But Rent Control… I think the total cost was $100,000, and to this director’s credit, I think it looks like $200,000.”

Brent Spiner

“I wanted to look right. I remember a review – a very positive one – in The New York Times that said I was so good in the role [Earl Mills] that I “even managed to overcome a terrible red wig.” I wanted to write her and tell her about the agony I’d gone through with the perm, but I thought better of it.”

Brent Spiner

“It was kind of an amazing class. I went to the Strasberg Institute in New York for a little while after I got there, and I’ve never seen anybody who was in any of my classes there ever again. I mean, that’s not to say they didn’t become somebody. I’m not sure. I mean, Sam Jackson could’ve been in my class, for all I remember.”

Brent Spiner